The MasterCharts: Summarizing 2011 In Nine Easy Charts
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Thursday, December 29, 2011

Summarizing 2011 In Nine Easy Charts

 

If one had to summarize 2011 in one sentence, it probably would be: "a year in which the market ended unchanged, in which the world got within seconds of global coordinated bankruptcy, and in which central planning finally took over everything." Simple. On the other hand, conveying a comparably concise message full of hope and despair at the same time, using charts would actually be slightly more problematic. But not for the Economist, which has managed to do just that, however not in one but nine discrete charts. Here is what they did.

From the Economist:

IN 2008 banks were saved by governments. The question that dominated 2011 was how to save governments. The euro-area sovereign-debt crisis metastasised from a problem affecting small, peripheral states to one that threatens the single currency itself. The rise in Italian bond yields in particular marked a dangerous new stage in the saga (chart 1). European banks, stuffed full of government bonds, have suffered a severe funding squeeze since the summer (chart 2). The euro was oddly resilient against the dollar, but Switzerland and Japan intervened to hold down their currencies as investors sought shelter (chart 3).

 

Faced with skittish creditors, countries in Europe tried to instil confidence by cutting spending (chart 4). Austerity and growth do not mix, however. Euro-area GDP remains below its pre-crisis level. American output did at least regain that mark in 2011 (chart 5) but US unemployment remained very high.

 

The emerging economies again outshone their rich-world counterparts in terms of growth and jobs. But fears about inflation (chart 6) slowly gave way to fears about growth as the year went on and Europe's problems worsened. Emerging-market stocks dropped sharply in the summer as investors put their money into less risky assets (chart 7). Gold also benefited from another year of fear. The metal was set to post its 11th consecutive annual gain in 2011 (chart 8). Google searches for "gold price" rose whenever measures of market uncertainty did (chart 9). If governments aren't safe, after all, what is?

Chart 1

Chart 2

Chart 3

Chart 4

Chart 5

Chart 6

Chart 7

Chart 8

Chart 9



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